Going South into Mexico

Coming from BC Canada, passing the Pacific Coast of US, we are now in Mexico. And every 1.000 NM the temperature, air and sea, is getting warmer. We do like it. Although I don’t know if it’s cultural or just the temperature, but people are outspoken, friendly and Spanish is a beautiful language. Cuando se habla rápido, es difícil entender.

Viva la Mexico

Ensenada

We first docked at Hotel Coral Marina in in Ensenada. It came with a pool and whirl-tub, nice restaurant, fuel dock. And across the street of the Marina a big grocery/supermarket, Soriana. We like the Mexican supermarkets for there one stop shopping, from groceries to my beloved yogurts, milk, meat, cleaning products, pasta, cans, frozen foods, wine and even booz, a good rum, gin or tequila. Because we are a dry boat, we enjoy a nice cocktail at anchor or in the marina.

The marina offers us a payed service to help us check-in into Mexico and we gladly accepted it. A typical Mexican thing is the TIP, a temporary, 10 years, import permit for your boat. The other thing are the Aviso de Arribo and de Salida, with you need in every port with a Port Captain.

On the first turn into the docks, no propulsion on my Port engine. My folding prop was needle rapped, ergo closed, with kelp.

Follow Sailors

In every marina you meet new people on boats, friendly, most experienced. Always with a word of advise and a strong story of high seas and strong winds just around the corner. And the numbers are really getting big as its all in feet.

The ongoing feet-meters, liters-US gallons, phantoms and fl-oz. confusion continues. Even the thread of bolts and nuts is different. And indeed SV Kiskadee is a metric boat. Hilarious, when my crew member looking at the Navionics chart in disbelief because he interrupted my 2 meters depth as 2 feet… So approaching a dock, it makes a lot of difference 3 feet or 3 meters… Conversion is easy, with the exception of F to C. So we know below 65 is cold and above 73F is nice. Enjoy

The first pictures of Mexico.

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